Feline Infections and Infestations

Rule out testing in the work-up of a pruritic cats or management of flare-ups

Bacterial and Yeast Infections

SKIN AND EAR CYTOLOGY

Cytology is useful in the diagnosis of bacterial pyoderma/otitis or bacterial overgrowth, Malassezia dermatitis/otitis, eosinophilic granuloma complex and pemphigus foliaceus.

Interpreted and reported by a certified dermatologist with images from actual slides submitted included in the report where possible.

CULTURE AND SENSITIVITY

Includes MRSA/MRSP

Ectoparasites and Fungal Infection

ECTOPARASITE SKIN SCRAPES

Useful to detect Demodex, Cheyletiella, Trombiculae (harvest mites), lice and flea dirt.

Interpreted and reported by a certified dermatologist with images from actual slides submitted included in the report where possible.

DERMATOPHYTE PCR

Sensitivity 87%, specificity 100%

Recommended for initial detection of dermatophytes.

Example results

DERMATOPHYTE SEQUENCING

DNA sequencing from submitted sample to provide speciation of fungi detected.

DERMATOPHYTE CULTURE

Recommended follow up to positive PCR results for monitoring response to treatment.

FLEA ALLERGY DERMATITIS (FAD)
If the pruritus persists after treatment of obvious infestations/infections, or no obvious cause was identified on initial investigation, the distribution of pruritus and/or lesions can be helpful for further investigations. Presence of recurrent dorsolumbar dermatitis, usually seasonal, is highly suggestive and a unique feature of flea allergy dermatitis (FAD)1.

Visualisation of fleas or flea faeces can be difficult in very pruritic, overgrooming animals. Pruritus and lesions usually resolve with diligent flea control.

Intradermal or serology testing is available, but false negative results are possible and do not rule out FAD1.

1. Hnilica, K. A. (2011) Small Animal Dermatology, 3rd ed. Elsevier

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